Sep
30
Jan 28

Night(Light) @North Carolina Museum of Art

Night(Light) explores light as it interacts with darkness in photography. In its purest form, photography harnesses light. The images give shape to light, immortalizing and suspending it.

Lynn Saville, Pepsi-Cola, New York, 2008, printed 2015, archival pigment print, 20 x 24 in., Purchased with funds from the William R. Roberson Jr. and Frances M. Roberson Endowed Fund for North Carolina Art, © 2016 Lynn Saville

Lynn Saville, Pepsi-Cola, New York, 2008, printed 2015, archival pigment print, 20 x 24 in., Purchased with funds from the William R. Roberson Jr. and Frances M. Roberson Endowed Fund for North Carolina Art, © 2016 Lynn Saville

The eerie feeling of night is not lost in these photographs from the Museum’s permanent collection. Under the cover of darkness, some photographs reveal nighttime mischief and behavior. Others convey the loneliness of night and the lurking desolation in each empty street and unlit hallway. Together, these images of night and light delve into photography’s formal properties and capture the darkest, most enigmatic time of day.  

East Building, Level B, Allen G. Thomas Jr. Photography Gallery

NORTH CAROLINA
MUSEUM OF ART

2110 BLUE RIDGE ROAD
RALEIGH, NC 27607

Sep
30
Jan 30

Rhythmic Vitality: Photographs by Barbara Morgan @ North Carolina Museum of Art

This exhibition features photographs by Barbara Morgan (American, 1900–92) from the NCMA’s permanent collection. Although Morgan, one of the founders of the photography magazine Aperture, is best known for her studies of modern dance, she also created photomontages and light drawings.

Barbara Morgan, Martha Graham, “Celebration” (Trio), 1937, printed later, gelatin-silver print, 17 7/16 x 13 13/16 in., Gift of Richard and Lois Zakia, © Barbara and Willard Morgan photographs and papers, Library Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA

Barbara Morgan, Martha Graham, “Celebration” (Trio), 1937, printed later, gelatin-silver print, 17 7/16 x 13 13/16 in., Gift of Richard and Lois Zakia, © Barbara and Willard Morgan photographs and papers, Library Special Collections, Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA

Morgan said: “Whether my work is large or small, abstract or realistic, the one thing that must be present is rhythmic vitality...it doesn’t matter if it is dance or montage or people or nature. There always has to be the presence of energy.” 

East Building, Level B, Julian T. Baker Jr. Photography Gallery

NORTH CAROLINA
MUSEUM OF ART

2110 BLUE RIDGE ROAD
RALEIGH, NC 27607

Organized by the North Carolina Museum of Art. This exhibition is made possible, in part, by the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources; the North Carolina Museum of Art Foundation, Inc.; and the William R. Kenan Jr. Endowment for Educational Exhibitions. Research for this exhibition was made possible by Ann and Jim Goodnight/The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fund for Curatorial and Conservation Research and Travel.


Oct
17
Apr 15

Transits and Migrations: A Summer in Berlin @ Center for Documentary Studies, Duke University

Duke’s summer course, Capturing the City: Documentary Photography in Berlin, pushed students to immerse themselves fully in one of Europe’s most dynamic capital cities. They interpreted scenes of cultural life, public spaces, landscapes, and people. Project fieldwork sites included Tempelhof airfield—a Nazi-era airport made famous during the 1948–1949 Berlin Airlift and now used as a public park and reception center for refugees—as well as the U-Bahn, Berlin’s subway system. Students also wrote fictional short stories based on vintage photographs purchased at Berlin flea markets and met with Berlin-based documentary photographers and writers.

The exhibition includes work by students Rachel Corr, Dai Li, Ellen Liew, Barbara McHugh, Iliana Sun, Genevieve Valladao, Katlyn Walther, Wenqin Wang, and Deanna White; as well as Gesche Wuerfel — who teaches at UNC-Chapel Hill, Grace Farson, a recent John Hope Franklin award winner, and class instructor, Christopher Sims.

Porch and University Galleries

Center for Documentary Studies

1317 W Pettigrew St.

Durham, NC27707

Oct
8
Feb 17

Panorama: North Carolina @ NCMA

In Panorama: North Carolina, the Old North State is the subject of over thirty photographs, lovingly created by North Carolina–based artists. These works from the North Carolina Museum of Art's permanent collection interpret the subject matter in varied ways.

John Rosenthal, Valle Crucis, 1979

John Rosenthal, Valle Crucis, 1979

Some images, like Elizabeth Matheson's Edenton and Luis Rey Velasco's Stovall, present specific towns or landmarks. Other photographs represent the soul of the state via portraits of its inhabitants, as in Rob Amberg’s Carter CrosbyHighway 24 SouthClinton, NC, and Jeff Whetstone’s Mingo Boys with Water Snake on the Eno River. A third grouping—a barren tree in winter, some lovingly tended gravestones—provides quiet reflection through still-life scenes. Combined, these images tell a story of the state as captured in black and white. 

A segment of Panorama: North Carolina features works from David Simonton's Polk Prison Project. The former Polk Youth Center, which occupied land adjacent to the Museum, was closed in 1997. Before the building was demolished in 2003, Simonton received access to the prison and captured interesting details of that space. Five images from this series, which was partially commissioned by the North Carolina Museum of Art, are included in the exhibition.

Elizabeth Matheson, Carolina Coast, 1986

Elizabeth Matheson, Carolina Coast, 1986

NCMA

2110 BLUE RIDGE ROAD
RALEIGH, NC 27607

October 8, 2016 – February 17, 2017

East Building, Level A, North Carolina Gallery; Free

Oct
8
Feb 17

Human Nature @ NCMA

Human/Nature features photographs from the NCMA’s permanent collection that relate individuals to both natural and man-made environments.

John Menapace, Untitled, 1972

John Menapace, Untitled, 1972

Our primary human instincts drive us to control, dominate, nurture, and find a connection to our surroundings. Each photograph in Human/Nature presents the relationship between man and the environment—comparing, for example, a desolate landscape with a similar close-up of the human body. In simple yet profound ways, these images manifest the many ways bodily forms echo forms in nature and drive home the importance of connecting to our habitat in a physical, tangible way. 

Michael Kenna, Yunoshima Island, Asamushi, Honshu, Japan, 2002

Michael Kenna, Yunoshima Island, Asamushi, Honshu, Japan, 2002

October 15, 2016 – February 26, 2017

East Building, Level A, Photography Gallery; Free

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART

2110 BLUE RIDGE ROAD
RALEIGH, NC 27607

Aug
13
Mar 12

Photographs by Hugh Morton: An Uncommon Retrospective @ NCMH

Photograph by Hugh Morton. © UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries.

Photograph by Hugh Morton. © UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries.

See North Carolina’s history and beauty through the eyes of photographer Hugh MacRae Morton (1921-2006). His captivating images will be featured in the exhibit Photographs by Hugh Morton: An Uncommon Retrospective, opening Saturday, Aug. 13, at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh. The exhibition produced by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library presents images taken by prolific photographer Hugh Morton, a Wilmington, N.C., native. Admission is free.

“Morton’s images showcase his love for Tar Heel people, events, landmarks, nature, sports and tourism,” said Museum Director Ken Howard. “We are pleased to highlight the work of this prolific North Carolinian whose career spanned eight decades.”

From breathtaking mountain views to scenes of coastal fishermen folding nets, the exhibit covers aspects of Morton’s various experiences as a photojournalist; as a soldier in the Pacific Theater during World War II; and as owner and operator of Grandfather Mountain tourist attraction in Linville. The exhibit’s 87 images feature dozens of his lesser known or unpublished photographs, as well as some classics.   

Morton’s photographs reflect his passions as an avid conservationist, environmental activist, sports fan and tourism booster in the Tar Heel State. Visitors toPhotographs by Hugh Morton also will discover that he was a prominent businessman and political figure in the state.

To create Photographs by Hugh Morton, Stephen Fletcher, photographic archivist at UNC Library’s North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives, selected images from the library’s collection of Morton’s estimated quarter-million negatives and transparencies. Fletcher and his co-workers made high-resolution digital scans from Morton’s original negatives and transparencies, which were made into prints for the exhibit.

http://ncmuseumofhistory.org/exhibits/hugh-morton-retrospective

 

North Carolina Museum of History

5 E Edenton St, Raleigh